tidbits


A couple of SOA Q&As

Posted on September 6th, by Arnon Rotem-Gal-Oz in Blog. No Comments

Every now and then I get some question by email, I usually just answer them directly but considering I got 2 such questions this week and that I have’t blogged for awhile (I do have a post about YARN which I hope to finish soon) – I thought I’d also publish my replies here.

Question #1 from Simon:

In your very interesting article “Bridging the Impedance Mismatch Between Business Intelligence and Service-Oriented Architecture” you highlight the challenges for BI and SOA to co-exist – that was 6 or so years ago – have you seen any advances that would cause you to revise that view?

I think the gap and dissonance between SOA needs and BI needs is still there. However, in addition to event publishing mentioned in the article, I see the approach to getting to BI on SOA getting more standardized. … Read More »

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ReSQL?

Posted on July 23rd, by Arnon Rotem-Gal-Oz in Big Data, Blog, Featured Posts, Uncategorized. No Comments

The NoSQL moniker that was coined circa 2009 marked a move from the “traditional” relational model. There were quite a few non-relational databases around prior to 2009, but in the last few years we’ve seen an explosion of new offerings (you can see,for example, the “NoSQL landscape” in a previous post I made). Generally speaking, and everything here is a wild generalization, since not all solutions are created equal and there are many types of solutions – NoSQL solutions mostly means some relaxation of ACID constraints, and, as the name implies, the removal of the “Structured Query Language” (SQL) both as a data definition language, and more importantly, as a data manipulation language, in particular SQL’s query capabilities.

ACID and SQL are a lot to lose and NoSQL solutions offer a few benefits to augment them mainly:

Scalability – either as relative scalability, … Read More »

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It’s open source, so the source, you know, is open…

Posted on April 1st, by Arnon Rotem-Gal-Oz in Blog. No Comments

Even though I mostly sit at work trying to look busy, every so often someone does stumbles into my office with a question or a problem so I’ve got to do something.

Interestingly enough, a lot of problems can be handled by some pretty basic stuff like like reminding people that a .jar/war file is a zip file and you can take a look inside for what’s there or what’s missing; or sending people to read the log files (turns out these buggers actually contain useful information) etc. – so now for today’s lesson: “It’s open source, so the source, you know, is open…”

We use a lot of open source projects at Nice (we’ve also, slowly, starting to give something back to the community but that’s another story). One of these is HBase, one of our devs was working on enabling … Read More »

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Distributed computing reading list

Posted on August 21st, by Arnon Rotem-Gal-Oz in Blog. No Comments

My twitter feed spewed a very good list of distributed computing related papers (compiled by Dan Creswell). There are links to a lot of papers there. Few of my favorites include The fallacies of distributed computing by Peter Deutsch – you may also want to check out the paper I wrote explaining them; Life beyond distributed transactions an apostate’s opinion by Pat Helland and also “The Byzantine generals problem” by Leslie Lamport, Robert Shostak and Marshall Pease, “A note of distributed computing” by Samuel C. Kendall, Jim Waldo, Ann Wollrath and Geoff Wyant and “Harvest, yield, and scalable tolerant systems” by Armando Fox, Eric A. Brewer which I mentioned before in “10 papers every architect should read”

There are a also a few additional papers that are not in that list and that I found illuminating:

“Architectural Styles and the Design … Read More »

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Tidbits

Posted on June 14th, by Arnon Rotem-Gal-Oz in Blog. 1 Comment

From time to time I am going to post a few thoughts that come up which are longer than a tweet but shorter than a post.

Software Architecture books

I recently got a question from Jon :

I am wanting to make the leap from senior engineer/team lead to software architect, can you recommend any good books or resources?

Well, my current top 5 books for architects are

Software system architecture –  Nick Rozanski and Eoin Woods.The book I wish I’ve written :) covers view and viewpoints very well
Software architecture in practice – Len Bass, Rick Kasman and Paul Clements – A good solid introduction to software architecture from the people at SEI
The art of system archieteting – Mark W. Maier & Eberhardt Rechtin. The best book on using heuristics with software architecture (there’s now a 3rd edition but I haven’t read it)
Enterprise Integration patterns … Read More »

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